"Mud Bogging - Proof You Should Be A Redneck"
by Fred Morris
Stop Trading Hours for Dollars




Imagine it: the sleek, shiny bodies, all in peak condition, battling it out in filthy, mud-slinging competition, emerging heated, covered in mud, and victorious even if they lost. No, these muck-covered beauties won't be on the cover of Sports Illustrated; they're more likely to be found on the pages of Off-Roading, especially the ones with tractor-grade tires.

Mud bogging is a sport that combines the thrill of racing, the love of top-performance vehicles, the fun of off-road mudding, and the never-outgrown little boy love of playing in the mud, getting as dirty as humanly possible. The sport began in the 1970s, when off-road afficionados started racing their vehicles through the most boggy, muddy, dirty areas they could find - notably, the swamps of North Carolina. Motorsports show organizers picked up on the trend and began including long mud-filled pits for racing in their shows, and as the sport grew in popularity among racers and spectators alike, mud bogging grew into its own organized competition.

In 1988, the National Mud Racing Association was organized in Dayton, Ohio, making this rebel sport a legitimate member of the auto sports racing family. Today, you can see mud bogging exhibitions and competitions throughout the country.

Mud Bogging Rules

Vehicles that compete in professional mud bogging are required to have four-wheel drive, and are generally turbocharged, high-clearance, oversize-tire vehicles, often with nitrous injections and other nifty modifications. Picture a monster truck on steroids, and you pretty much have it. There are six classes of mud bogging vehicles, from stock four-wheel-drive vehicles all the way up to non-street-legal paddle and scoop tired madly-modified vehicles.

Bog tracks can range across a variety of types, from flat or progressive tracks to open bogs, even hilly tracks with rises punctuated by mudholes along the way. Tracks are up to 300 feet in length, usually determined by the amount of space allowed by the arena rather than what promoters think the vehicle can handle. It is common today to see mud bogging competitions at the same events that feature monster trucks because the two types of vehicle overlap; in fact, some of the best mud bogging racers first became known for driving monster trucks.

The racing is serious, and is generally as simple as a set of matches pitting winners versus winners. But if you go to watch mud bogging, you're almost certainly interested in the fun of the flying mud, not in who wins. Like in mud wrestling, both vehicles win, provided they come out thoroughly covered in mud.

If you want to get into mud bogging for yourself, the best route is by getting involved in mudding locally. Most country areas have a group of guys - and sometimes gals - who go mudding on a regular basis, seeking out the nastiest muddiest holes and driving ordinary four-wheel-drive vehicles through it. Many of these groups are happy to teach you how to get your car as dirty as possible, as fast as possible, and they frequently hold meets or are associated with mud bogging groups.

Honestly, though, if it sounds like fun, just go do it. Just make sure your cell phone has power before you get started - just in case you find more bog than mud.

Contact the Author

Fred Morris is the owner of RedneckandSingle an online community of over 18,000 single rednecks seeking romance, friendship and adventure. Visit http://www.redneckandsingle.com/ and find your own redneck.

Fred Morris

Site: http://www.redneckandsingle.com

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